Wilderness Survival Cordage


How to make rope, cordage, and twine from natural materials found in the wilderness.

25 Comments on "Wilderness Survival Cordage"

  1. HedgehogLeatherworks | January 28, 2010 at 12:41 pm |

    Thanks! Maybe someday! I appreciate the kind words!

  2. bowmasterpigo13 | January 28, 2010 at 1:24 pm |

    do u have a book out if not you should thansk for posting

  3. HedgehogLeatherworks | January 28, 2010 at 2:18 pm |

    Awesome! Thanks for the encouragement!

  4. bowmasterpigo13 | January 28, 2010 at 2:49 pm |

    just been on ur website love it all great video cant wait for some more uploads thanks for posting 5 stars love it

  5. HedgehogLeatherworks | January 28, 2010 at 3:23 pm |

    Mostly the desert southwest, but we have it here in the midwest too.

  6. where abouts do yukka grow?

  7. elenalejeune | January 28, 2010 at 4:36 pm |

    awesome as usual!

  8. good vid man ,make bow strings vid

  9. bushcraftourway | January 28, 2010 at 5:40 pm |

    nice sandels paul!

  10. HedgehogLeatherworks | January 28, 2010 at 5:57 pm |

    Nice! Thanks for commenting!

  11. Also you can use the roots of a young yucca plant to make soap, thats what my mother use to use when she was a child.

    Back in the day before the country side had modern technology.

  12. captaincoolness55 | January 28, 2010 at 6:28 pm |

    thanks man! 😀

  13. HedgehogLeatherworks | January 28, 2010 at 7:09 pm |

    I would recommend splicing in sooner and having the lengths run together for a while before letting one run out. That ought to do it… if not, then there must be an issue with the way you are wrapping the cordage… I hope this helps!

  14. captaincoolness55 | January 28, 2010 at 7:40 pm |

    everytime i make cordage, and i try to splice a piece in, it breaks at that part. like the cordage i made 1st, within the last 5 mins, will let the new cordage i’ve spliced in slip out. i’m wrapping everything tight, and i’ve tried several methods of coiling the cordage, but nothing seems to help. why does this happen? (also, if you don’t have yucca plants anywhere near you, try corn husks. they’re very fiberous just like yucca, but don’t have all that slime and whatnot you mentioned)

  15. HedgehogLeatherworks | January 28, 2010 at 7:44 pm |

    Cool! Thank you!

  16. Great technique! Thanks!

  17. HedgehogLeatherworks | January 28, 2010 at 9:18 pm |

    Hahahah! That is funny! Thanks for commenting!

  18. blargers123 | January 28, 2010 at 9:59 pm |

    thanks!! wow. My braided piece of agave looks like crap now…

  19. Just trying to help out

  20. Sotol is a centruy plant and its actually whats you describes as yuca, not a big deal they are related. Yuca is like a small tree or very thick stalked brush…still has the same style of leave though….FYI my background is thatt i am a primative survival instructor (professinally now for 8 + years) in southern texas, which is surronded by that particular style of plant….

  21. Yes it is true that yuca and sotol are some of the strongest natural fibers for cordage. His description of yuca is actually sotol some types of sotol can be caustic to the skin and cause blistering… Some of the best ways to prepare the plant would be to crush the leaves with a rock then soak in water…after the leaves become soft, (while wearing gloves) rub the leaves on a rock to separate fiber from pulp. Now you have your fiber for cordage!

  22. bigjohn20081983 | January 29, 2010 at 12:09 am |

    i have heard the part of the cat tail thats real fluffly make good tender to catch a spark and start a fire i have never tried it but i do know there is an eposoide of suvivor man where les dose do it

  23. HedgehogLeatherworks | January 29, 2010 at 12:47 am |

    Great tip… thank you!

  24. bigjohn20081983 | January 29, 2010 at 1:09 am |

    i have done this here in florida but we used the palmato bush to do it you can use the palm frawns to water proof a shelter and the stalks to make your cordage

  25. HedgehogLeatherworks | January 29, 2010 at 1:44 am |

    Thank you! Please stay tuned and subscribe if you aren’t already!

    Kind regards,
    Paul

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