Living in Troubled Lands: Beating the Terrorist Threat Overseas

Product Description
Written by a CIA officer who spent his career planning and implementing security programs for Americans stationed abroad, this is a comprehensive guide to reducing your vulnerability to terrorism. Improve the odds against you with tactics that have been put to the test in some of the most dangerous areas of the world…. More >>

Living in Troubled Lands: Beating the Terrorist Threat Overseas

3 Comments on "Living in Troubled Lands: Beating the Terrorist Threat Overseas"

  1. Despite having been originally written in the 1980’s this book remains relevant today. The book teaches you to be your own security consutant. The checklists are valuable to anyone who is doing a threat and vulnerability analyis. Whether you are an aid worker with an NGO, a diplomat, an English teacher or running a small business in a developing country it will be useful to you. Even if you work for a multinational and can afford a security consultant it can be valuable so that you can assess whether or not your security staff are doing their jobs correctly. If you are going overseas get this book!
    Rating: 5 / 5

  2. In planning an overseas move to Nigeria security is a concern for my family. I’m thankful for such a concise book of wisdom and practical advice. This is a book that delivers what it promises.
    Rating: 5 / 5

  3. I was an American soldier in West Berlin when I obtained my first copy of Patrick Collins “Living in Troubled Lands.” In the turbulant 1980’s the joke was that the Polish airline, Lot, had scheduled skyjackings to Templehof Central Airport every week. Anti-draft and anti-American riots were common in West Berlin. The Berlin Wall was a land-mined, electrified barbwire reality. The spy game was in full Cold War swing. Yet most G.I.’s in West Berlin were ignorant of the threat–despite constant G-2 briefings and sensational newspaper stories.

    Collins’s book is easy to read, well organized, and based on workable personal security procedures. One warning–Collins puts personal security above obeying local laws. Collins says that the major threat to Americans overseas is being complacent and arrogant–and that ordinary crime is the next big threat (I think it is motor vehicle traffic!). Collins talks about assessing your own personal security situation, then addresses specifics: your residence, your office, your automobile, weapons (including firearms), and how to integrate your family into a security plan. How-to information on surviving being kidnapped and held hostage is relavent even 25 years after Collins wrote “Living in Troubled Lands.” At the end of the book is a series of security checklists. You won’t be able to get a better personal security program without spending several thousand dollars. This book will “teach you to fish” so that you will be able to provide most of your own security. Avoiding terrorist attack is mostly a matter of staying out of the terrorists’ crosshairs.

    I used “Living in Troubled Lands” as my personal security blueprint through two 3-year tours in Germany as an American soldier, through a 5-year and a 2-year contract as an anti-terrorist security officer in the Middle East, and for my mundane anti-crime personal security program in the United States. Professionally, these principles made me an effective security officer and kept me out of trouble as a soldier in Germany and in the Middle East last year. I keep handing out copies of Collins’s book to friends and coworkers because these procedures work.

    Individuals must take charge of their own personal security. No matter how much professional security a person has, that person can derail his own program–“his” is appropriate, given the number of men killed or kidnapped because they gave their protectors the slip to keep a date with their girlfriends–who just happened to be part of a criminal gang, terrorist group, or in the employ of a hostile government or rival corporation. If you don’t care about your own security, who will?
    Rating: 5 / 5

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